Saturday, April 14, 2012

M is for Mother Goose


M is for Mother Goose. Mother Goose is known for her nursery rhymes.
  
Who is Mother Goose?
In the United States, some call her by the name Elizabeth Foster Goose or Mary Goose, but in reality she is not actually a real person despite the rumours.

Charles Perrault in 1697, was the first to publish a collection of Mother Goose rhymes or tales (Contes de ma mère L'Oye ) contributing to the spread of the fairy tale genre perhaps even starting it depending on who you ask. The Grimm brothers were responsible for taking fairy tales and making them appropriate for children.

Why are nursery rhymes so popular?
There are some nursery rhymes that have underlying message.  For example “Ring around the rosie, pocketful of posie” is actually about the black plague.  Before we had books and widespread literacy, stories were passed down orally. What better way to remember a lesson then to sing it, make it rhyme, and use the same words over and over again. 

Nursery rhymes are also used in the classroom as a literacy tool as they are a fun way to learn. According to the host over at K-3 Teacher Resources nursery rhymes, “significantly enhances early reading skills and phonemic awareness (the ability to hear the sounds and distinguish between them in the English language).”

 Challenge
--Create your own nursery rhyme. Or
--Write a fractured nursery rhyme.  Children’s poet Kenn Nesbitt, over at Poetry 4 Kids has a neat exercise on how to write a fractured nursery rhyme.  Instead of me re-wording his lesson. Click here to find out more.

Resources

If you liked this post please let others know. Tomorrow, I’ll be posting all the poems I wrote this week and offer a couple of tips for revising your poems. On Monday, I’ll be discussing nature poetry. I hope you come back for that.  In other news my debut guest post, "How Writing Poetry Can Help You Be a Better Writer" is now available for reading over at The Graceful Doe's Blog. 

Now for a laugh!

I’m a little puggie, short and stout.

Here is my bum. 

Here is my snout.

When I get all wound up, hear me pout.

Just open the door and let me out!


To see/hear an original version of I’m a Little Teapot click here.


16 comments:

  1. You should call that Pug Tails how cute! Great post Rena, I learned a lot reading it.

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    1. Thanks. I did have a series on my old blog "Pug and the Princess" and I lost those posts when I transferred my blog to this address.

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    2. I also like the title "Pug Tails" as it's clever.

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  2. Awww, sweet little rhyme about your pug.

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    1. Thanks. I'm a bit of dork, but this what happens when I spend my days around my dogs instead of humans.

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  3. Catherine, great suggestion on the title. Rena, I love that you include your doggie in your writing. Too cute! How could I not guess that M would be for Mother Goose. I thought a lesson on meter or something. I love Mother Goose. For so long child development centers stopped making these rhymes part of their curriculum. I am glad to again see the practice of using Mother Goose rhymes for phonemic awareness in emergent readers. Okay, Rena! This is another fun one.

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    1. I had thought about doing a post on meter and moving Mother Goose to N for nursery rhymes but I love, love, love nature poetry. I work from home so I spend my day hanging out with my pets. They have inspired a handful of stories and poems.

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  4. Rena, I absolutely love your pug nursery rhyme. I have sang through several times :-)
    Mother Goose is perfect for M. I love nursery rhymes.
    I have mine ready to go
    http://wp.me/p22d5X-fw

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  5. Very cute! Loved your pug oh and I loved you post today. Mother Goose Nursery Rhymes.... ahhhhh those were the days!

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    1. Thanks. The pug provides endless hours of entertainment. I have collection of Mother Goose rhymes that I pull out once awhile to re-read them.

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  6. Thanks for the history lesson on Mother Goose! I didn't know all that.

    Here is mine:

    It's Lonestar Lonestar
    The fox had a guitar
    The pig flew into a car
    The rat snickered
    At all the fuss
    And the queen took a trip with the czar.

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    1. Almost forgot, wonderful tea pot rendition! So cute!

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    2. Thanks. Haha. I can just see this rat shaking his head!

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  7. What a fun post, Rena. Your pug is adorable! :)

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    1. Thanks. He loves to get his picture taken.

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Thanks for your comments. Remember to keep them kid friendly.