Monday, April 30, 2012

Z is for Zig-Zag

Z is for zig-zag and zee end! Haha. I didn't think I would make it. Just kidding. Seriously, how are all you doing after a long month of poetry? One more to go and poetry month has been officially celebrated!

Take a journey on a Zeppelin
by Bill Boudreau

What is a zig-zag poem? I'm not sure if this form really exists. A zig-zag poem is when you take the last word from a line and use it to start the next line in the poem so that it creates a zig-zag down the page.


See the Zepplin soar
Soar high above
Above the trees below
Below the thundering raid


Raid the cupboards bare
Bare the bumpy ride
Ride the skies tonight
Tonight you travel home


Length? As long as it takes to tell your story.


Challenge
--Write a zig-zag poem. Imagine floating along in a Zeppelin. What do you see? What do you smell? What do you feel? Now write a poem and you are done!


Resources
--To learn about the Zeppelin click here.


If you liked this post please let others know with a click of button below.  Tomorrow, the A to Z Poetry Contest opens to those who have signed up and taken part in my A to Z Poetry Challenge.  I hope you come back for that!  If you are wondering what now? Don't fret.  Starting mid May, I'm launching a new series that will include fabulous poetry, illustrations, and some sort of activity. Stay tuned for this exciting poetry series! 


Remember you can always connect with me on Facebook and Twitter, or Pin me in Pinterest, link up on LinkedIn, and add me to your Google Circle.


Do you want to catch up or re-visit earlier poetry posts? Here are the most recent poetry posts: 

Saturday, April 28, 2012

Y is for You

 Self-Portrait of Rena by Bill Boudreau
Y is for you. Today is all about you. I want you to spend the day thinking about yourself then write a poem.


What is a self-portrait poem? It's a poem about yourself. Here are some things to think about when writing your poem. 
  • Name
  • Traits
  • Son or daughter of
  • Lover of
  • Who feels
  • Who needs
  • Who fears
  • Where do you live
  • Physical descriptions
  • Hobbies or interests
  • Favourite food
  • Friends
  • Dream
  • Goals

I wrote this poem about myself about a month ago. Some of you might have seen this poem on my website. 


COME IN! COME IN! BUT BEWARE OF THE FIERY HAIRED WRITER!

In the middle of nowhere,
in the province of Alberta, 
lives a writer,
with pasty skin and long red hair. 

She lives in a castle—
crowded with books, dogs, and rabbits—
surrounded by a moat and
a field full of cars.  

She sits at a desk,
tapping away 
on her
glowing scheming machine.

She carries a cup, 
full of hot liquid mud
that she throws at kids
caught spying in her windows.

So BEWARE of the fiery haired writer
who lives in a castle,
brewing up a batch
of fantastical stories!


Challenge
--Write a poem about yourself. 


Resources
--Autobiographical Portrait Poem Generator
--Portrait Poems and Examples


If you liked this post please let others know with a click of button below. I'm taking Sunday off. Fine day Sunday. In my opinion the best day of the week. Why is that? Because there is no post on Sundays. I hope to see you on Monday, for the unveiling of 'Z'. 


Remember you can always connect with me on Facebook and Twitter, or Pin me in Pinterest, link up on LinkedIn, and add me to your Google Circle.


Do you want to catch up or re-visit earlier poetry posts? Here are the most recent poetry posts: 

Friday, April 27, 2012

X Marks the Spot

The Found Poetry Project brought to you by The Found Poetry Review, has been creating and distributing found poetry kits in celebration of National Poetry Month. They have also been asking for individuals to create found poetry kits and leave them in public spaces. This way people walking by can create their own found poems. I just found out about this so I decided to create an online version of the kit. Since this is an online version, I can't provide you with a pen and paper. You can use the comments below to write your poem if you wish! 




Click on image to make bigger

Click on image to make it bigger

Source Text 

Oxford Canadian Dictionary of Current English
  • Over 125, 000 words, phrases and definitions
  • Over 800 uniquely Canadian words and senses
  • Easy-to-understand pronunciation guidance for difficult words
  • Dependable guidance on Canadian spellings
  • More Canadian coverage than any other dictionary of its size
TVs most engaging and unlikely crime-solving due is back in the spectacular second season of ABC's Castle. The banter flies faster than the bullets in this unique series, loaded with drama, romance and laughs. 

Best-selling mystery novelist Rick Castle's unique approach to crime solving may have won over Detective Kate Beckett, but their relationship is still on rocky ground.

From Cinder
Click on image to make it bigger

Bushy tailed thief /in the tree/dodge the growling dogs/back and forth/ from thick to thin/to rooftop scaling/ down to the feeder hut

May's Grocery List for the Food Bank (from the Lac Ste. Anne Bulletin) 
  • Box of cereal
  • Small peanut butter
  • Canned Meat (ex. salmon, tuna)
  • Canned vegetables (beans, corn, peas)
Proof positive: when you have to edit your own copy

Click on image to make it bigger
INTO THE WOODS (Fables -Wolves p.101)

No one quite knew where they planned to go on their honeymoon, or how long they might stay.

A little more champagne, Mrs. Wolf?

But true to Boy Blue's promise, their house in Wolf Valley was finished and waiting for them by the time they returned. 

Go pick your rooms, children. You each have one of your own.

So do you think happily ever after is possible after all?

We'll see. 

Stomp your feet!
Clap your hands!
Everybody ready for a 
BARNYARD DANCE!

(Barnyard Dance! by Sandra Boynton) 

Challenge
--Create a found poem using bits and pieces from the source text on this page. Please leave   some words in the comment section below so that I can create a found poem from your comments. 

Resources
--Go to www.foundpoetryproject.com to read found poems, upload your poem, or for further information.

If you liked this post please let others know with a click of button below. Tomorrow, Y is for you. I hope you come back for that. 

Remember you can always connect with me on Facebook and Twitter, or Pin me in Pinterest, link up on LinkedIn, and add me to your Google Circle.

Do you want to catch up or re-visit earlier poetry posts? Here are the most recent poetry posts: 

Thursday, April 26, 2012

W is for the W's

W is for the W's. Today, author Debbie LaCroix is joining us to talk about the W's. Julie, once again, has out done herself with her wickedly wicked illustration. Thanks Debbie and Julie!

I met Debbie through the 12x12in12 challenge (a picture book challenge hosted by Julie Hedlund). I also had the pleasure of following Debbie, as she won round after round in Ed DeCaria's March Madness, 2012 poetry competition, in which Debbie won second place. Congrats Debbie! Now on to the W's!


Wicked
Illustration by Julie Rowan-Zoch

Do you know your W’s. W’s hold your creativity together like glue. Without them, your poem or story will fall apart.

What are your W’s?
W: Who
W: What
W: When
W: Where
W: Why
And most important…………………

W: Write

A wise teacher told me the W’s lead you to the basics for your story.  To write a good story, you need to know:

Who your characters are.
Your main character is very important. You need to know them inside and out, and you need to know their voice. Make sure you interview them to know more about this character. But you also need to know the other characters in your story. If they are involved, they need to have a purpose.

What they are doing.
What are your characters trying to accomplish in your poem or story. If you are not writing about characters, what is the moral of the poem, or what imagery do you want to construe to your audience.

When the story takes place (today, past, future).
When does your story take place? You need to if it’s set in the future, today, past or a made up time. All elements of your story or poem need to match. For example, you can’t be writing about the 1800’s and have the young princess get a phone call.

Where is the setting.
Where are your main characters? Is the setting here, there, or nowhere? Where are they travelling to?

Why is the character doing that.
Why is your character acting in such a way that could get him run over by a car? Why is he jumping into a freezing river?  What is his or her motivation. Why is the bird flying backwards? When stuck with writing, ask yourself, “why?” If you don’t know, take a moment to figure it out.

Once you have all the above, then it’s time to write.It doesn’t matter if you have your W’s, if you don’t do this. So the most important W, is Write! Write! Write! But “W” goes even deeper than the basics. Let’s take a closer look:

Who are you writing for?
You need to know your audience. If you are writing for children, you will want to leave out any inappropriate language, imagery, or topics they would not care to learn about. Writing about Wall Street would not be a great poem for 2nd graders, unless it was about a street surrounded by a wall.

During March Madness, poetry competition (www.thinkkidthink.com), I was given seed words that I had to incorporate into my poems for children. Often my motivation on how to use this word would dictate who I was writing for. My use of Jerky gave me a poem about learning to drive, which is an older audience then Pummeled, which was about stuffing toys into a closet. 

What are you writing?
Not only what is your story about, but what are you writing? What type of poem or story are you working on? Do you want it to rhyme? Is it a sonnet? What is your pattern and rhythm?

What do you want to accomplish with this poem? Is it for fun? To teach a life lesson? To win an award? 
Know your WHAT.

When is your deadline?
This can be a deadline for a contest, or a self-imposed deadline. But you need to know when you will finish it by. For projects without a deadline, be realistic and break it down into smaller goals. Write your date down so you hold yourself accountable for finishing.

Where do you write? 
Do you have a writing center? I often get asked (especially by my children’s friends who come over for the first time), where do you write? Create a space where you can enter your mind comfortably and get it all down.

Why are you writing this story or poem? 
What is your inspiration? Why do you want to put this on paper? Your why is your internal motivation. Without it, you have no reason to write.

Challenge
--Using today's prompt "wicked" write a poem using the W's. Or
--Write a W poem on a topic of your choosing. 

Resources
--5 W's Poem. Click here to get a worksheet and to see an example. 
If you liked this post please let others know with a click of button below. Tomorrow, X marks the spot. I hope you come back for that!
Remember you can always connect with me on Facebook and Twitter, or Pin me in Pinterest, link up on LinkedIn, and add me to your Google Circle.

Do you want to catch up or re-visit earlier poetry posts? Here are the most recent poetry posts:

Debbie is the author of "It's Almost Time" by Kane Miller. When not writing, she sells kids books and volunteers in her community. She is the mom to two boys, two cats, a dog, and three hermit crabs. 


To learn more about Debbie head over to her site @ www.debbielacroix.com





Julie Rowan-Zoch graphic designer morphed by motherhood into super-volunteer, spun into a pre-pubbie cocoon, soon to emerge writer and illustrator of children’s books! To learn more about Julie check out her fabulous blog by clicking here or find her on Facebook by clicking here

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

V is for Video

Vampire Rabbit
Illustration by Julie Rowan-Zoch
V is for video. Today, children's writer and poet Renee LaTulippe is joining us. Thanks Renee! Thanks Julie for another fabulous illustration. 

I met Renee through the 12x12in12 challenge (a picture book writing challenge hosted by Julie Hedlund). Being relatively new to writing children's poetry I was thrilled when I came across her blog, No Water River. Her blog is full of fun poems for kids and the best part each poem is accompanied by a video. She is going to share one of her fabulous poems today minus the video. But don't fret you can head over to her blog and watch many of her fun videos. 

Renee,  why do you write poetry? 
Mainly because it’s fun! I have always loved words and wordplay, so I get a kick out of putting together sounds and syllables and arranging them just so, so they are fun to read and dance to. At least, that’s the aim. Whether I succeed all the time is a whole ‘nother question. (Sometimes, though, writing isn’t fun at all – it’s even a torture for me. In those cases, I agree with my pal Dorothy Parker: “I hate writing; I love having written.”)

What kind of poetry do you write? 
I write children’s poetry, probably aimed toward the younger set and pretty much always in rhyme. I especially like to create weird little characters and write poems about them that are little stories in themselves. I didn’t start with children’s poetry, though. Back in the day, I was all about adult poetry in free verse, but it turns out that’s not where I should be hanging out (I mean…really). I do plan on playing with free verse and different forms in my kids’ poems, though.    

What inspires you to write poetry? 
Absurdity. I love absurd happenings and humor, twisted looks at normal things, the possibilities of “What if…?” Plain old silliness/being silly inspires me. Penguins. And my husband, who is also a literary type and a master at wordplay in Italian. Not only is he my brainstorming partner, but he also has a little hobby of thinking up book and poem titles that are often so funny or bizarre or thought-provoking that they make me wonder “Now what would that book/poem be about?” In fact, the name of my blog No Water River came from one of his titles in Italian (Il Fiume Senz’acqua).   

Who is your favourite poet? Why? 
I don’t have a favorite anything because my tastes are so varied. I might adore one poem or book by an author, but detest every other word that author has ever set on paper. What can I say, I’m fickle! My favorite tends to be whoever I happen to be reading at the moment. Right now that person is Amy Ludwig VanDerwater, who is brand new to me and whose poetry I have just fallen in love with. At other moments in my life it has been Sylvia Plath, Adrienne Rich, and every other great female poet, and of course I love and admire Dorothy Parker for her wit and humor – her poetry is a bit morose, but she kills with her one-liners! For the guys, I like Robert Frost, William Carlos Williams, and Billy Collins for their gifts of observation and beautiful writing that is accessible to all.

What is your favourite poem? Why? 
See above! Oh, all right, let’s see if I can name one or two. Since I am a theatrical type who prefers her poetry read out loud, I am drawn to poems with juicy words or emotions or characters. That’s why I like Plath’s “Daddy,” Coleridge’s “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner,” (as I wrote about on Katie Davis’s blog), Carroll’s “Jabberwocky,” anything by Shakespeare, Whitman’s “O Captain! My Captain,” and Dr. Seuss’s “The Grinch Who Stole Christmas.” Told you my tastes run the gamut!   

 A piece of advice you would like to share with your fellow poets? 
As I’ve written elsewhere…get on your feet during the writing process! Say the words at full voice, not under your breath – but be wary of falling into the same speech rhythm over and over. To avoid that, pick a different imaginary audience to read to each time (your peers at a café, bigwigs at an awards ceremony, kids in the park, a group of attentive penguins) and in different situations (a rap concert, a church, the middle of an Oscar Wilde play). I swear, nothing helps me hear the hiccups more in the early stages of writing than getting out of the chair and giving voice to the words. Later, of course, it’s a good idea to give it to other people to read aloud – they won’t have your rhythm already in their heads, so you’ll get a “truer” reading and hear what doesn’t work.    

Why do you create video poetry? 
I simply believe that poetry is a living thing that’s meant to be heard and savored orally and aurally, not just dissected on paper and left there with its guts hanging out. I am especially adamant about this when it comes to sharing any literature with kids – whether it’s a poem or Huck Finn – because, for me, appreciation (of language, story, character, and craft) must come first. In fact, I’m pretty sure that “formal text analysis” happens naturally if you just let kids live the literature and get excited about it – I mean, who wants to analyze something she doesn’t first feel in her bones or heart? [Off soapbox, exit stage right]

So yeah…I do poetry videos because I want kids to see that poetry is alive and fun and not scary and waiting to be slurped up with a straw.

Can you share a tip or two about making poetry videos or reading poems out loud?  
Sure! When you’re making a video or just reading a poem aloud, the most important thing is to make sure your audience can understand what you’re saying! That means using good diction and being aware of voice production, which takes practice. The goal is to avoid speaking from your throat by centering your voice on your front palate and supporting it with good breathing technique. Like I said, this takes practice, but quickly becomes second nature. Good vocal production will give your voice a pleasing resonance and prevent you from “swallowing” your words or losing the ends of sentences in your throat.  

Another tip comes from the oral interpretation unit of the public speaking course I taught, and that is to go through the poem many times, marking up the “script” in whatever way makes sense to you. I use musical notation, or a system of underscores, circles, slashes, and highlights to mark pacing, pauses, emphasis, loudness/softness, gesture, movement, and so on. This is called “scoring the script” (as an actor might do with a play script) and will be your roadmap to a layered reading.  

Of course, these are just quickie tips. Anyone interested in learning more will find lots of info just by searching the terms “basic vocal production,” “oral interpretation,” and “scoring the script.”

Any recent publications and/or accomplishments you would like to share with us?
I’m currently sharing my poetry on my blog at No Water River, via print and video, and am working on pieces for submission. In the meantime, I am thrilled to continue writing poems and stories for the early readers published by All About Learning Press. It was for AALP that I wrote and recorded 42 kids’ poems for the book Lizard Lou: a collection of rhymes old and new – and what a “frabjous” project that was!

I've said this before and I'll say it again.  Renee, I would have loved to have had you as a teacher! Thanks for coming on my blog today. Now a poem by Renee. 



Ugly Pants from Lizard Lou
Ugly Pants


I have a pair of ugly pants
with rips around the knees.
They have pink stripes and polka-dots
and smell like moldy cheese.


They’re made of fleece and burlap,
and they’re weird and warm and snuggly.
If I wore them to a costume ball,
I’d win the prize for ugly.

I wear them every weekend,
though the other kids may tease,
but I just love my ugly pants
for climbing in the trees.

I know I shouldn’t boast or brag,
but I can say this smugly:
no one has a pair of pants
so perfectly, beautifully ugly!

(“Ugly Pants” by Renée LaTulippe. Licensed by All About Learning Press, Inc. Copyright © 2010, 2012 All About Learning Press, Inc. All Rights Reserved. No portion of this material may be copied, retransmitted, reposted, duplicated, or otherwise used without the express written approval of All About Learning Press, Inc.)

Challenge
--Since poetry is meant to be performed when you write your poem today, I want you to perform it. No, you don't have to create a video, but try performing your poem in front of your kids, spouse, or a trusted friend! Try writing a poem about something that is absurd like a vampire rabbit!  Or
--Use today's word "vampire" to write a poem. 

Resources
If you liked this post please let others know with a click of button below. Tomorrow, author Debbie LaCroix will be joining us to talk about the W's. I hope you come back for that.


Remember you can always connect with me on Facebook and Twitter, or Pin me in Pinterest, link up on LinkedIn, and add me to your Google Circle.

Do you want to catch up or re-visit earlier poetry posts? Here are the most recent poetry posts:
A former English/theater/communications teacher and wannabe starlet, Renée is the editor at All About Learning Press and a children’s writer. She also blogs on language and grammar at AALP (often under the guise of her alter ego, the Chipmunk of Doom), and composes silly poems for her own blog No Water River. Renée holds a BFA in acting/directing from Marymount Manhattan College, an MA in English Education from New York University, and a Ph.D. in…oh, wait, no, that’s it. 

To read and hear more of Renee's fabulous poetry head over to her blog No Water River


Julie Rowan-Zoch graphic designer morphed by motherhood into super-volunteer, spun into a pre-pubbie cocoon, soon to emerge writer and illustrator of children’s books! To learn more about Julie check out her fabulous blog by clicking here or find her on Facebook by clicking here. Stay tuned to see more illustrations from Julie. 

Tuesday, April 24, 2012

U is for Universal

Rena's Universe 
Photo by Rena J. Traxel
U is for universal.  I love how poetry, and I have mentioned this before, "has the power to cut through all the crap we accumulate in our lives and touch us to the quick, to make us not only recall our childhood, but also re-experience the less complicated joys and sensations of that not always guileless time" (Gary Geddes).

How does poetry have this power over us? One of the reasons is the use of universal or common experiences such as birth/death, love/friendship, pain/loss, war/justice etc.Take a look around us. The books we read, the movies we watch all tap into universal or common experiences. Why? Because it draws us in and helps us to relate to, or understand the story therefore enjoy it. 

Why is this important? First off, I think it’s important to write what you want to write. But a savvy artist pays attention to what is happening around him/her. Using the market to his/her advantage. For example, during the Romantic period (late 1800th century) many poems depicted nature, loss of innocents, and the industrial revolution.  Today, the arts are littered with references to technology. Since poetry helps us to understand the world around us, it makes sense to write about common experiences.

What if you write poems for children or silly poems? The same rule can be applied.  All you have to do is think about that child’s universe.  You can still write about friendship, or love or loss etc., but the approach to these poems will be different. The language used will be different. The metaphors and similes must be drawn from the child’s universe. 

Challenge
--When you write your poem today think about your audience.  You can use today’s word “universal” as prompt for your poem.  And/or
--Write a poem that depicts your universe that you think others could relate to (Are you retired? Do you have kids? Are you student? Etc.).  I did this when I wrote my sonnet about being a writer.  

Resources
--To see a list of universal themes click here.

If you liked this post please let others know with a click of button below. Tomorrow, children's poet and writer Renee LaTulippe from No Water River will be joining us. I hope you come back for that. 


Remember you can always connect with me on Facebook and Twitter, or Pin me in Pinterest, link up on LinkedIn, and add me to your Google Circle.

Do you want to catch up or re-visit earlier poetry posts? Here are the most recent poetry posts:
  • T is for Twitter: All about Twitter poetry. 
  • S is for Sonnet: How to write a sonnet. Plus interview with writer and poet Linda J. Pedley. 
  • R is for Rhyme: Tips on Writing Stories in Rhyme (tips provided by author Kari-Lynn Winters). 
1. Gary Geddes: 20th-Century Poetry & Poetics (5th ed). Preface.

Monday, April 23, 2012

T is for Twitter


African Safari Journals

T is for twitter.  Twitter is a fantastic way to share your poetry with others. You are going to have to keep the poem short or make the first couple of lines so enticing that readers will want to come over to your blog to read the rest of the poem. 




How do you create a Twitter poem?
1.     Keep the poem under 140 characters (including spaces). You can check your character count by pasting your poem into Twitter or use an online character counter
2.     Use  /  (forward slash) to indicate a line break.
3. Use // (two forward slashes) to indicate a stanza break.
4.     If you have any left over characters use a hash tag when posting your poem to Twitter. This helps people find your poems (even those who aren’t following you yet). Try #poetry or #poem

If you are having trouble writing a Twitter poem, try thinking of a single moment. For instances, yesterday my dogs were going crazy watching a squirrel trying to get from the tree to the bird feeder.  Here it goes:

Tiny squirrel in the tree/dodge the growling dogs/back and forth/ from thick to thin/rooftop scaling/ down to the feeder hut  #poetry #poem

I had two characters to spare.

Or

Bushy tailed thief /in the tree/dodge the growling dogs/back and forth/ from thick to thin/to rooftop scaling/ down to the feeder hut #poem

I had 1 character to spare.  I tweeted this second version on Twitter just this morning. My twitter handle is @renajtraxel

 Whew! Now it’s your turn.

Challenge
--Write a twitter poem and posted it to twitter. Or
--Write a series of twitter poems that link together to tell a story. 

Resources
--Click here to read some Twitter poetry. 
--Character counter click here

If you liked this post please let others know. Tomorrow, I'll be discussing universal themes. I hope you come back for that. 

Sunday, April 22, 2012

N to S: Poetry Challenge Recap

Congrats! To completing week 3 of my poetry challenge!


Here are some tips to get your poems sparkling! 


1. Read your poem several times focusing on a different element each time (word choice, punctuation etc.). 
2. Check out this article How to Submit Poems for Publication

Now here are my poems. 


N is for Nature
Today's challenge was to write a poem about nature. My poem was inspired by last year's rain followed by a onslaught of slugs!


My garden last spring
Attack of the Slugs

I toiled and toiled,

it rained and rained.

Slither-Slather

the slugs came in. 



I sprayed and sprayed,

they wormed and wormed. 

Split-Splat

Don't come back!

O is for Onomatopoeia
Today's challenge was to use onomatopoeia in a poem. My poem was inspired by Kari-Lynn's book On My Walk. To read my interview with Kari-Lynn click here














Spring Is Here



Flitter-flit

In the trees

Biz-buzz

Busy bees



Drip-drop

Pouring rain

Budding-buds

On the plain



Splish-splash

Muddy paws

Sing-song

Hear their caws



Pitter-patter

Gopher run

Sticky-stick

Webs are spun



Vroom-vum

In the streets

Whiff-waft 

Tasty treats



Spring-sprung

Can't you see?

Groundhog Phyllis

Jump for glee!


*My fellow 12x12er (Susanna Leonard Hill) wrote this fabulous book April Fool Phyllis and recently sent Phyllis around the world (I think she is overseas right now).  Phyllis stopped to visit me on March 31 (click here to read about it). I had a fun and sunny day with her, but when she left on April 1st, she left behind a big pile of snow! April Fool Phyllis indeed!

P is for Prose Poem
Today's challenge was to play with form and write a prose poem.  To see my Raggedy Ann prose poem click here. I wrote a new prose poem for the challenge. 

Written in Prose

P is for prose Write a poem A page or two will do Forget the breaks But for heavens sake Don’t forget The period!

Now written with breaks

P is for prose
Write a poem
A page or two will do
Forget the breaks
But for heaven sakes
Don’t forget the period! 

Q is for Query: Your Choice
Today's challenge was to think about submitting work for publication and to write a poem in your preferred style. I shared my query letter. Click here to read my critiqued query. 

She sits on my desk. 


Brass girl
Reading a book

Childhood memories
I remember that look

Far off stare
Magical realm
I couldn’t bear
To put the book down

“Rena, time for class!”
He yelled and yelled
Can you believe
I almost got expelled?

R is for Rhyme
Today's challenge was to write a poem in rhyme and to think about actions that could go along with the poem. Author Kari-Lynn Winters offered some tips on writing in rhyme. Click here to read her tips. 

Imaginary Sand

With my bucket in hand
and a pile of sand.

Scoop-splat
Scoop-Splat

Form the head, the ears, the nose.
Shape the body down to the toes

Scoop-Splat
Scoop-Splat

In the end
a sandy friend!

S is for Sonnet 
Today's challenge was to write a sonnet. I gave the option of using humour. To read a Shakespearean style sonnet or learn how to create sonnet click here

What does it mean to be a writer?
Will I be poor or find success?
To be a writer you must be a fighter
And know that it’s worth the stress
What does it mean to be creative?
A mind that just won’t sleep
My writing mind may need a sedative
Or perhaps I’ll count sheep
But Dori, Corey and Lorie
Those sneaky little sheep
Will start to tell a story
Once again no beauty sleep
This is my tale so listen up
And get out of the way of my coffee cup!


If you liked this post please let others know. Tomorrow, Twitter poetry. I hope you come back for that! I hope you have a wonderful Sunday.